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Currently, all TALG lectures are being delivered via Zoom.  Our IT partner, Canadian Webinar Solutions, has provided this comprehensive user guide on downloading and using Zoom; we encourage you to read it.

AM Series: Wednesdays, 10:00am - Noon

Our Planet in Rehab:
Paths to Sustainability

The Winter 2022 morning lectures take a look at the environmental crisis of our time. We don’t want to state the obvious; everyone knows we are talking about an immense problem. However, in our survey of TALG learners, people said they would like to hear what is being done to address the problem.

am series

As it happens, and probably not surprising, several of our speakers are at the University of Guelph which is widely known for its leading programs in life sciences. We call the series “Our Planet in Rehab: Paths to Sustainability” and are proud to present eight speakers who will discuss subjects ranging from corporate responsibility to food and water scarcity, power generation, waste management, environmental activism, wildlife recovery and biodiversity.

The issue is a serious one, but we believe our lectures will leave the audience with more knowledge and a level of hope. Human ingenuity knows no bounds!

Jan 12, 2022
Environmental, Social & Governance Responsibility

Ruben Burga

Environmental, social and governance (ESG) reports are used by firms to report and signal their commitment to sustainability and social values. With growing concern about the ethical status of business, ESG reports are used by investors to measure a firm’s impact on sustainability oftentimes measured against the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Prof Burga will discuss Paths to Sustainability through the lens of ESG and the UN SDGs. He will describe how the Third Age can be impactful through wise investment in companies who are accountable to their ESG criteria.

Host

Ruben Burga

Ruben Burga is Assistant Professor in Management at University of Guelph’s Lang School of Business & Economics. He started his career as a mechanical engineer in high technology manufacturing and new business development in Canada, the US, Southeast Asia, Europe and Latin America. He transitioned to academia with research interests in organizational leadership and management issues viewed through the lenses of knowledge transfer, corporate social responsibility, and accountability principles and their effect on firm performance. Learn more about Prof. Burga.

 

Jan 19, 2022
Developing Canada's first agri-food sustainability index

David McInnes

Establishing the National Index on Agri-Food Performance will help to affirm Canada’s agri-food leadership credentials and mark progress to a more demanding food world. By developing an integrated view of sustainability from farm to retail, Canada’s first agri-food sustainability index will become a key tool to help Canada’s agri-food sector compete, improve societal and environmental outcomes, and inform policy-making. Thisnovel initiative is being shaped by a diverse and growing private-public coalition of over 50 partners. David's talk will discuss why this is needed and how it is being developed.

Host

David McInnes

David McInnes is Principal, DMci Strategies. Astrategic advisor on the Canadian and global food system, he is a member of the Agricultural Research Institute of Ontario, a committee member of the Canadian Agri-Food Sustainability Initiative, a fellow with the Arrell Food Ins

Jan 26, 2022
Water – Sustainability for Everyone?

Ed McBean

Water is not a ‘nice to have,’ it is essential for life. However, as the years pass, issues involving the scarcity of potable water at many locations around the globe will intensify.  In discussing whether sustainability will exist in different parts of the world, Professor Ed McBean will focus on (i) Canada, (ii) southeast Asia, and (iii) some of the reasons that issues of water sustainability lie beyond a country’s borders and will become extremely contentious. Canada needs to pay close attention; we need to be concerned.

Host

Ed McBean

Ed McBean, University of Guelph. Following an undergrad engineering degree from UBC and a PhD degree from MIT, Ed was a faculty member for two decades at University of Waterloo, then Vice-President of one of the largest consulting firms in Canada for a decade, and now, for two decades at U of G, a Professor of Water Resources Engineering, Canada Research Chair and Research Leadership Chair in Water Security. Learn more about Ed McBean.

Feb 2, 2022
Power generation

Neetika Sathe

The energy industry, like many other industries, is undergoing a generational shift as customers, communities and governments are seeking simpler, cleaner, and more sustainable energy solutions. Consumers, with access to constantly evolving technology, coupled with a heightened sense of responsibility to tackle climate change, are a key driving force behind this shift. They are demanding change in the way energy is generated, delivered, bought, and sold. Neetika will share examples of customer-centric initiatives that the Alectra Green Energy and Technology Centre (GRE&T Centre) is embarking on in the energy sector.

Host

Neetika Sath

Neetika Sathe is Vice President of the Alectra Green Energy & Technology Centre (GRE&T Centre). Through her direction, the GRE&T Centre is Alectra's latest step to be at the forefront of exciting industry changes to make energy innovations come to life by identifying, evaluating, developing, and accelerating emerging, clean, and customer-friendly energy solutions across Alectra's service territory. Neetika holds a master’s degree in Physics from Panjab University and an MBA from McMaster University.

Feb 9, 2022
Global waste management.

Bassim Abassi

Bassim E. Abbassi, PhD, P.Eng. is a professor of environmental engineering at University of Guelph.

His research includes:
- Decentralized and Onsite Wastewater Treatment
- Electrochemical Advanced Oxidation and Electrokinetics in Wastewater Treatment
- Electrocoagulation for Phosphorous Removal from Wastewater
- Electroflotation in Treating Food Processing Wastewater
- Solid and Hazardous Waste Management
- Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in Engineering Design

Host

Bassim Abassi

Dr. Bassim E. Abbassi received his PhD from the University of Bremen, Germany in 1997. In 1998-2014 he taught at Al-Balqa’ Applied University in Al-Salt, Jordan, where he held several positions including Head of the Department of Water Resources and Environmental Management and Dean of Scientific Research. In 2014, he was Visiting Professor in the School of Engineering at the University of Guelph. He joined the university as a full-time faculty member in 2015 and is now a professor in the School of Engineering and Director of Ontario Rural Wastewater Centre.

Feb 16, 2022
Environmental Activism in Canada.

Leigh Paulseth

What does environmental activism look like in Canada? Leigh will provide a brief introduction to some of the most famous political demonstrations and discuss the community organizing that was foundational to these actions. Activism comes in many forms – from direct action and peaceful protest to community organizing and politics. Fast forward to present day, Leigh will provide examples of activists and movements taking place in Canada now, including Indigenous resistance to resource extraction and her own community’s fight against unscrupulous development in Durham Region.

Host

Leigh Paulseth, Green Party Candidate, Ajax.

Leigh Paulseth (B.Sc., MREM) is a passionate environmentalist with six years experience working with environmental non-profits and five years in science education and community outreach. She has been involved in campaigns to resist oil pipelines in Ontario and protect Rouge Park. She successfully helped to stop development of the Duffins Wetland by a provincial Minister’s Zoning Order and ran as a Green Party Candidate in the 2021 Federal Election.

Feb 23, 2022
Protecting biodiversity

John Fryxell

John Fryxell will present an overview of the ecological case for protecting biodiversity, the many challenges we face, as well as encouraging signs of success. Drawing on examples of organisms both great and small, he will illustrate the need for both innovative new ways to measure the immeasurable and bold conservation initiatives needed to protect biodiversity for our grandchildren’s grandchildren. 

Prof. Fryxell’s research includes behavioral and ecological studies of plants, herbivores and carnivores in Africa, Canada, and Norway as well as terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates in southern Ontario.

Host

John Fryxell

John Fryxell, PhD, FRSC, is Professor and Executive Director of the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario (BIO). The institute’s aim is to enhance understanding of the processes that shape biodiversity and to develop effective management tools to conserve and protect biodiversity during an era of rapid environmental change. BIO is a central node that links a broad community of biodiversity researchers, both at the University of Guelph and globally. Read more about Prof. Fryxell here.

Mar 2, 2022
Stopping the Sixth Extinction Starts at Home

Dan Kraus

A Canadian perspective on global wildlife conservation. We are currently witnessing our planet’s Sixth Extinction. While the plight of elephants, tigers and gorillas is well known, Canada is also rapidly losing its own wildlife. This presentation will explore the species we’ve lost from Canada, the major drivers of wildlife loss, the history of our responses, and what we can all do to halt extinctions. We will also examine the species that we’ve managed to pull back from the edge of extinction and why their recovery should give hope to conservation. 

Host

Dan Kraus

Dan Kraus is Director of National Conservation with Wildlife Conservation Society Canada and teaches at the University of Waterloo. He has worked on projects ranging from Great Lakes planning to the natural capital of forests. He is an expert on Canadian biodiversity and is a member of the IUCN Species Survival Commission and the Committee on the Status of Species at Risk in Ontario. His editorials on conservation have appeared in media across Canada. 

Registration >

PM Series: Wednesdays, 1:30pm - 3:30pm

Newfoundland & Labrador

Think of a place in Canada you would like to visit and likely your mind will drift to either British Columbia or Newfoundland.  There is something about the melding of oceans, rugged cliffs, forested vistas, small towns and outports that captures the imagination.  Beyond the scenery, however, what do we really know about Newfoundland & Labrador, the most eastern province of Canada?  What do we know about the history, the economics, the people and the culture of this land?  What is unique about the arts and even the cuisine?

pm series

Come and explore the rich fabric of this delightful part of Canada and gain fresh insights from lecturers who call it “home.”

Jan 12, 2022
Shape of the Landwash: Newfoundland and its Ever-Changing Coast

Dr. Donald L Forbes

People were drawn to the Newfoundland coast more than 6000 years ago (Europeans hundreds of years ago) by the abundance of coastal food resources, which led to settlement on the coast. This lecture will introduce the geology, landscape, climate and oceanography of the island of Newfoundland, “this marvellous, terrible place.” We will examine the dramatic changes in the shape of the shoreline (the ‘landwash’) in the wake of the last glaciation, and of the various coastal and landscape hazards that continue to challenge coastal communities in Newfoundland.

Host

Dr. Donald L Forbes

Don Forbes is an emeritus research scientist with the Geological Survey of Canada and adjunct professor at Memorial University of Newfoundland. He holds degrees from Carleton, Toronto, and UBC. From seabed geological mapping to sea-level rise, coastal hazards to climate-change adaptation, he has 50 years of diverse experience ranging across the Canadian Arctic, South Pacific, Newfoundland, and elsewhere. He was a Lead Author on the IPCC when it was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007.

Donald L. Forbes
Editor, The Griffin, Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia (donforbes@htns.ca)
Research Scientist Emeritus, Geological Survey of Canada
Adjunct Professor, Geography, Memorial University, St John's NL
Adjunct Professor, Earth Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax NS

 

Jan 19, 2022
Western Newfoundland and the History of the Seven Year’s War and the American Revolution?

Dr. Rainer Baehre

Dr. Baehre’s chapter, “Newfoundland’s West Coast and the Gulf of St Lawrence Fishery, ca. 1755-1783: A Case Study of War, Fish, and Empire” is based on extensive research both by him and many others.  This talk explains how this coastline was used by European fishers since the 1500s and remained heavily contested.  He will discuss how the region’s natural environment shaped French, American, British, Quebec, and Indigenous history in the region and had a significant role to play from the time of the Acadian expulsion to the American Revolution.

Host

Dr. Rainer Baehre

Dr. Rainer Baehre is a professor of Historical Studies at Memorial University, Grenfell Campus, in Corner Brook, Newfoundland.  He has published extensively on pre-Confederation Canadian history including Outrageous Seas: Shipwreck and Survival in the Waters Off Newfoundland, 1583-1896 (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1999) and most recently a chapter in The Greater Gulf: Essays on the Environmental History of the Gulf of St. Lawrence (McGill-Queen’s University Press,2019) upon which this lecture is primarily based.

Jan 26, 2022
Economics in Newfoundland & Labrador -  Towards 2041

Ed. Hollett

A survey of major themes in Newfoundland and Labrador economic development and a look ahead to the next 20 years.

Host

Ed. Hollett

Ed. Hollett is a public relations and public policy professional with more than 30 years experience in both the public and private sector.

A former aide to Premier Clyde Wells,  Ed has represented clients in the aerospace, fishing, agriculture, technology, and health sectors. He writes the long-running online column Bond Papers and is a frequent media commentator on public issues.

He studied at Memorial University and as a civilian graduate student at the Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston.

Feb 2, 2022
The Music of Newfoundland

Jim Payne

Newfoundland and Labrador is well known for the traditional music and song derived from the Anglo-Irish roots of its early European settlers. Join Jim Payne, one of the province’s leading performers, for a musically illustrated romp through the work songs and shanties, comic ditties and poignant ballads that are such a significant part of the local repertoire. Learn how the instrumental dance music of the province has been shaped by the diatonic button accordion, the difference between jigs and reels, and how the unique dynamics of the instrument align with the sea rhythms that have shaped the lives of generations of people around the rugged coastline of this province.

Host

Jim Payne

A native of Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland, Jim Payne is an award-winning performer, collector, and producer of traditional Newfoundland music, as well as an actor, storyteller, dancer, educator and songwriter, whose songs reflect issues faced by coastal peoples of the North West Atlantic.

Jim owns and operates his own recording and production company, SingSong Inc., and his website, <singsonginc.ca>, features over 50 titles by a wide variety of NL artists that reflect the Newfoundland and Labrador musical experience. He has toured extensively over the past 40 years throughout North America, the US, Europe, Japan and Australia, and teaches courses in traditional Newfoundland music and folk song at Memorial University’s School of Music.

Feb 9, 2022
How Land and Sea Shaped Newfoundland’s Traditional Culture

Dr. G. Pocius

European settlers to Newfoundland brought with them their own traditions, but over a five-hundred-year period a new culture emerged--shaped by both land and sea. Newfoundland’s speech, cuisine, and customs reflect this special landscape. Newfoundland language was enriched with new words adapted from activities particular to the terrain and ocean (a “prong” forked fish and turned hay; one gets “aboard” both a boat and car). A special meal might include cod tongues or cod britches, either fried in pork fat (scrunchions) with toutons and a scalded duff. And houses tightly clustered in a compact village facilitated constant visiting customs, from “cups of tea” to Christmas mummers and fools.

Host

Dr. G. Pocius

Gerald Pocius is Professor Emeritus in Folklore at Memorial University, and Senior Research Fellow at Cape Breton University, where he currently teaches. His award-winning book, A Place to Belong, examined understandings of cultural landscape in one Newfoundland community. He is a Fellow of both the Royal Society of Canada and the American Folklore Society. Pocius received the Barbeau Medal from the Folklore Studies Association of Canada for his lifetime contribution to Canadian folklore studies.

Feb 16, 2022
Considering Beothuk Extinction, Fact or Fiction?

Dr. Angela Robinson

Description coming soon.

Host

Dr. Angela Robinson

Dr. Angela Robinson is an Associate Professor of Anthropology in Social/Cultural Studies, Grenfell Campus, Memorial University, Newfoundland and Labrador. As a proponent of engaged anthropology, Dr. Robinson works closely with community members on projects of local and regional significance. Her early work among the Mi’kmaq of Nova Sco5a, and Newfoundland and Labrador, focused on traditional and contemporary cultural expression. Her more recent work, an exploration of her ancestral heritage in a project entitled, “Heritage, People and Place: Mapping Local, Ecological and Traditional Knowledge in King’s Cove, Bonavista Bay”, is based on personal and professional interests.

Feb 23, 2022
Literature of Newfoundland & Labrador

Lisa Moore

How does imagery in Newfoundland literature make the ground beneath the reader’s feet concrete, wind-riven, tactile, rain soaked and full of scent? How does a storm-ravaged landscape or the shape of a living room, the architecture of a shed or convenience store or oil rig, a bar or beach, inform our understanding of a character? How does the rhythm and cadence of a sentence inform or disrupt or solidify our notions of gender, class, and race in stories from Newfoundland? How does the voice of the author create a world, and are the worlds we find in Newfoundland literature unique and particular to the place? I will discuss examples of Newfoundland literature and the particular ways imagery and voice shape those stories.

Host

Lisa Moore

Lisa Moore is the author of the novels February, Alligator, Caught and the young adult novel Flannery, as well as the short story collections, Degrees of Nakedness, Open and Something for Everyone. She is the co-librettist, along with Laura Kaminsky, of an opera adapted from the novel February. Her new novel, forthcoming May, 2022 is called This is How We Love. Lisa teaches creative writing at Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Mar 2, 2022
Multiple Faces of Colonization

Lorraine Michael (B.A.(Ed.), M. Div.)

Newfoundland and Labrador had a long history as a separate country within the British Empire before joining the Confederation of Canada in 1949. 

It is a land rich with natural resources which continue to provide a major percentage of provincial revenues.

It was also occupied by indigenous people for thousands of years.

Strategies for the future will depend on co-operation among the five indigenous bodies in the province and the governments of NL and Canada.

Host

Lorraine Michael (B.A.(Ed.), M. Div.)

Born in St. John’s, Lorraine Michael was raised in the Lebanese community. Lorraine is now retired. As an elected Member of the House of Assembly, feminist, and committed activist for gender and racial social and economic justice, Lorraine’s career spanned more than 50 years.

It encompassed everything from teaching throughout the province for 12 years, to community development, to international solidarity – always informed by her experience as a Newfoundlander.

Lorraine has degrees from Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador and the University of Toronto.  

Registration >

Contact Us Today!

TALG welcomes your enquiries, input and feedback! We’d love to hear from you, whether you have a question, a great topic or speaker to suggest, or are interested in volunteering.

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