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As of September 2022, all lectures are at Harcourt United Church, 87 Dean Avenue in Guelph and simultaneously streamed online.

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AM Series: Wednesdays, Sept. 14-Nov. 2, 2022, 10:00am - Noon

 Music in Our Lives

What is life without music? This series will explore the wonder of music and its power to affect our lives in so many ways, including our minds, emotions, health, identity, social interactions and communication. We will explore its celebratory, ceremonial and spiritual significance as well as its force in politics, the environment and social change.  Mostly we’ll delight in the pure joy of music in our lives!

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September 14, 2022
Rock stars, Community, and The Land: The Triple Bottom Line of a Not-for-profit Community Festival

Marie Zimmerman

Hillside has been a carbon-neutral festival since 2019 and a grassroots community celebration of artists and creativity since 1984.  What are the challenges and successes of implementing sustainable measures and of pursuing a tall-order vision and mission that wishes to deliver not only on creativity but also on equality, peacemaking, altruism, and environmental stewardship?  This lecture will attempt to answer that question while examining the triple bottom line--cultural, environmental, and economic—of an organization that has been an artistic presenter for 39 years.

Presenter

Marie Zimmerman

Marie Zimmerman is the Executive Director of the Hillside Festival in which capacity she oversees outreach, finance, operations, risk management and HR, and teaches songwriting.  For over 15 years, she has worked for five Canadian arts festivals in music, dance, jazz, film and literature, acting as Artistic Director, publicist, HR consultant, emergency plan architect, strategic planner and Treasurer.  She is a guest lecturer on arts, culture, and sustainability, and a founding member of the Guelph Fab 5, a collective of local arts festivals.  After her lecture, Marie Zimmerman may be contacted at executivedirector@hillsidefestival.ca for any follow-up questions or information.

September 21, 2022
Music, Movement, and the Brain

Dr. Jessica Grahn

Moving to music is an instinctive, often involuntary activity, experienced by humans in all cultures. This talk will take a neuroscientific perspective on why humans may move to music, and how the brain’s movement centres light up in response to music and rhythm, even when we aren’t moving a muscle. We will discuss how  individuals vary in their ability to synchronize accurately to a musical beat, and the importance of considering the individual when exploring the exciting potential held by musical interventions for those with degenerative neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease.

Presenter

Dr. Jessica Grahn

Dr. Jessica Grahn investigates how music affects our brain and behavior. Her topics include: how music makes us move, how musical training changes brain structure, and whether music can benefit patients with neurological disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease. She has undergraduate degrees in Neuroscience and Piano, a PhD from Cambridge University, and is now a Professor in Psychology at Western University. She is a member of the Royal Society of Canada College of New Scholars, and President of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition. She has received awards from the British Science Association, Ontario government, the James S. McDonnell Foundation, and most recently the prestigious Steacie Fellowship.

After her lecture, Dr. Grahn may be contacted at jgrahn@uwo.ca for any follow-up questions or information.

September 28, 2022
Upheaval and Unrest: Politics, Protest, and Popular Music

Dr. Alyssa Woods

Music has been an important tool for protest throughout history. Popular music, in particular, has served as a voice for the disenfranchised, as well as a location for the expression of important commentary on socio-political issues. This lecture will explore the historical foundations and ongoing relevance of popular music as an instrument of protest in North America. From Black Lives Matter and #MeToo to Idle No More, popular music (hip-hop, country, pop, rock) provides not only a soundtrack but also a medium through which artists and listeners negotiate current political realities and contribute to public discourse on critical issues.

Presenter

Dr. Alyssa Woods

Dr. Alyssa Woods is a popular music scholar whose work intersects the areas of music theory, gender and sexuality studies, critical race studies, and religious discourse in hip-hop music and culture. Dr. Woods holds the position of Associate Professor in the School of Fine Art and Music at the University of Guelph, where she is also a member of the research team and Site Coordinator for the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation. Her research involves interdisciplinary approaches to music-analytic and socio-cultural analysis with recent work focusing on the concept of mythmaking, genealogy, and succession in hip-hop. She is currently working on a book length project, entitled Temptation and the God Flow: Sound and Signification in Pre- and Post-Conversion Hip-hop.  After her lecture, Dr. Woods may be contacted at awoods08@uoguelph.ca for any follow-up questions or information.

October 5, 2022
Music and Peacebuilding

Dr. Marta McCarthy

In this lecture-demonstration, we will begin by considering the personal nature of musical experience: how our emotional engagement in music stimulates our imagination and nurtures our creative energy. Then, defining Peacebuilding as engagement in “activities that address root causes of violence and foster peaceful conflict resolutions …”, we will draw connections between Music and Peacebuilding. Focusing on the ineffable, mystical qualities of choral music and the phenomenological essence of vocal expression, we will explore the potential of choral singing to foster critical awareness and to motivate us to positive action. We will look at a few examples of how vocal groups around the world serve as models for a just and heterogenous society. Finally, we will survey several interdisciplinary collaborations between University of Guelph Choirs and our colleagues in science and agriculture; after listening to the music, we will hear how students felt “moved” from music-making to peace-building.

Presenter

Dr. Marta McCarthy

Conductor Marta McCarthy, Associate Professor, has directed the choirs and taught at the University of Guelph since 1995. Under her direction, the UG choirs have achieved national and international acclaim for excellence in performance and for the promotion of social justice and peace. Whether through teaching, through conducting, or through service to the national community - as President of Choral Canada and as presenter at numerous conferences – McCarthy strives to implement choral singing as a means of nurturing a world where compassion eclipses shame and hope surpasses fear.  After her lecture, Dr. McCarthy may be contacted at mmccarth@uoguelph.ca for any follow-up questions or information.

October 12, 2022
Connecting Through Music

Angela Randall, RP, MTA

We have been using music to connect and communicate since the beginning of time. 

Music brings people together all over the world.  It inspires us, excites us, and motivates us.

It is one of life’s earliest experiences and in late adulthood musical memories remain as some of the most deeply rooted.  Music encourages relaxation and active participation, promoting the development of community, and relationship building.  As we connect and come together our health, self-esteem, mood are improved and contribute to increased quality of life.  In this workshop we look at how we can use music with intention to connect with ourselves and others to help foster mental health, social connection, and wellbeing.

 

Presenter

Angela Randall, RP, MTA

Angela Randall is a sincere and compassionate person with a passion for music and its many benefits.  She grew up in a home filled with music and has geared her life towards providing musical learning and healing for others.  Angela graduated from Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, with a Bachelor of Music Therapy degree and General Psychology.  Her main instrument is the piano; however she also enjoys playing guitar, flute, and other instruments.  She has been working within the field of music therapy for twenty years and finds great satisfaction in seeing the growth and enjoyment that music can bring into the lives of others.

Angela established Expressions Music Therapy Services and went on to become a Registered Psychotherapist. It is Angela’s dream to bring joy and wellbeing to the people she works with through musical interaction and expression.  After her lecture, Angela Randall may be contacted at angela@expressionsmusictherapy.com for any follow-up questions or information.

October 19, 2022
Siren of the Occult: Composer Marcelle de Manziarly at the Edge of a New World Order

Kimberly Francis

This lecture will discuss the connections between occult beliefs and feminist ideals in France between the two world wars. The case study that will serve as the central focus for this discussion is composer Marcelle de Manziarly, a student of the famous pedagogue, Nadia Boulanger. I present Manziarly’s fantastical life as a composer, a voyageuse, and a deeply passionate Theosophist, exploring how alternative religious practices served an important political and creative function for Manziarly and other women of her generation.

Presenter

Kimberly Francis

Kimberly Francis is Professor of Music and Director of Interdisciplinary Programs at the University of Guelph. Her work has been featured internationally, including in the New York Times and on CBC Radio. She is the author of Teaching Stravinsky: Nadia Boulanger and the Consecration of a Modernist Icon (Oxford, 2015), Nadia Boulanger and the Stravinskys: A Selected Correspondence (University of Rochester Press, 2018), Nadia Boulanger: Thoughts on Music (with Jeanice Brooks, U Rochester, 2021) and co-editor with Margot Irvine of Creative Women of the ‘Lost Generation’ (Routledge, forthcoming).  After her lecture, Kimberly Francis may be contacted at kfranc02@uoguelph.ca for any follow-up questions or information.

October 26, 2022
Truth to Power: Listening to (and Learning From) Music as a Sound Track for Social Change

Dr. Ajay Heble

Can music change the world? Indeed, there’s a long and illustrious history of debate on this issue, and there are many compelling examples that reveal music’s role as a force for positive change, its capacity to act as an important vehicle for mobilizing movements for social justice, at home and around the world. Whether they’ve been talkin’ ‘bout a revolution, fighting the power, or saying (or playing) it loud, musicians—sometimes with words, sometimes without—have found compelling ways to sound off against systems of oppression, to use music as a soundtrack for resistance, change, hope, and direct action. In this session, we’ll listen to, and learn from, some of these sounds of change with a particular focus on jazz and improvisation.

Presenter

Dr. Ajay Heble

Ajay Heble is the founding Director of the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI), and Professor of English in the School of English and Theatre Studies at the University of Guelph. His research has covered a full range of topics in the arts and humanities and has resulted in 15 books published or in press, numerous articles or chapters, and over 100 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows trained and mentored. From 1994-2016, he served as the founding Artistic Director of the award-winning Guelph Jazz Festival and Colloquium.  After his lecture, Dr. Heble may be contacted at aheble@uoguelph.ca for any follow-up questions or information.

November 2, 2022
R. Murray Schafer and the Art of Exaltation

Brooke Dufton and Neal Evans

In this lecture, you’ll learn who R. Murray Schafer was, and how and why he wrote music and theatre pieces specifically designed to be performed in wilderness locations. We will talk about Schafer’s work in creating the World Soundscape Project, and how this affected his subsequent creative output, and influenced our understanding of sonic ecology. We will explore the Patria series with an emphasis on the Princess of the Stars, the Enchanted Forest, And Wolf Shall Inherit the Moon, all of which are designed for site specific outdoor locations.

We will talk about our own experience performing in these works and look at the impact this change of context has on the audience. Along the way we will try a Murray Schafer “Ear cleaning” exercise, make a little music of our own and experience the culminating aria of the Patria series.

Reference Materials:

Books by R. Murray Schafer (available from Arcana Editions https://patria.org/arcana/index.html )

Patria and the Theatre of Confluence (1991) 

The Thinking Ear: On Music Education (1986) 

The Tuning of the World (The Soundscape) (1977), republished as The Soundscape (1994) 

My Life on Earth and Elsewhere (The Porcupine’s Quill Publishers, 2012 https://porcupinesquill.ca//bookinfo6.php?index=272 )

 

Book about R. Murray Schafer

Scott, L. Brett, R. Murray Schafer: a creative life, Lanham, Maryland, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2019.

 

Films/videos about R. Murray Schafer

https://www.nfb.ca/film/listen/

Music for Wilderness Lake (Rhombus Media 1980)

Presenter

Brooke Dufton and Neal Evans

Soprano Brooke Dufton holds a DMA in voice performance and pedagogy from the University of Toronto, and has written and presented papers on Canadian vocal music, on the music of R. Murray Schafer, and on the impact of outdoor performance contexts on audiences and performers. She has taught and guest lectured for a number of institutions, including the Glenn Gould School; the University of Toronto; and Mount Allison University, where she was also the director of the Opera ensembles. She is a frequent performer of Schafer’s music, and has played roles in several of his Patria works, including Ariadne in both The Princess of the Stars and the Wolf Project.

Neal Evans is a Toronto based Double Bassist/Sawyer very familiar with the work of Murray Schafer.  He has been a member of the Wolf Project since 1998 and has performed in two recent Luminato productions of Schafer’s work: The Children’s Crusade (2009) and Apocalypsis (2015).  Evans contributed bowed saw to "September Song," an immersive interdisciplinary installation by Heather Nichol (Harbourfront Centre, Toronto 2021) and double bass in her new work “Mary, Anne, Joan” for the National Arts Centre in Ottawa this year.  He performs with the Niagara symphony, the Esprit orchestra, Opera York and with old time bands Kitgut and The All Day Breakfast Stringband and is a member of the Wing and String Collective.

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PM Series: Wednesdays, Sept. 14-Nov. 2, 2022,  1:30pm - 3:30pm

Masters of Espionage

In many ways, espionage is an art. As such, it requires very specific skills from those who practice it. Of course, espionage is nothing new. Espionage rose to prominence under Queen Elizabeth I with the cunning Francis Walsingham and played a leading role in the US War of Independence, the Napoleonic Wars as well as WWI and WWII. Espionage’s “Golden Age” curtain was drawn in 1991 with the end of the Cold War. The dawn of cyber warfare, often associated with the threat of terrorism and foreign interference in national elections, has since challenged global intelligence communities. Indeed, cyber warfare has been a major component of the war between Russia and Ukraine, a second and most crucial battlefield. From the first day of its “special military operation,” as Vladimir Putin called it, Russian hackers were hard at work to neutralize most Ukrainian government websites. A fascinating gallery of portraits of “masters” in espionage.

Espionage image

 

 

September 14, 2022
Decoding the secret language of espionage

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

An introduction to the world of espionage and its language. Exploring the meaning of some of the key words such as “asset,” “double-agent,” “HUMINT,” “SIGNINT” and “deception.” A look at the circumstances behind the founding of the first secret services, from Elizabeth I to Louis XVI and the French contribution to the independence of the USA

Presenter

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

An accomplished lecturer, historian and author, Dr. Courteaux received his PhD in History from the University of Paris-Sorbonne and was a faculty member at Royal Military College and at Ryerson University. He is a frequent lecturer for later life learning programs in Toronto, including those at Glendon College and Ryerson University, and spoke at TALG’s series on China’s Belt & Road Initiative in 2021. He is the author of Canada Between Vichy and Free France, 1940-1945 (2013) and Four days that rocked Quebec on Charles de Gaulle's famous 1967 "Vive le Québec Libre" (2017). He is currently working on his latest book, Suez, 1869, the last triumph of the Empress Eugenie.

 

September 21, 2022
The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

The Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars pitted France against most of Europe and paved the way for intense espionage activity. A look at the British and Napoleonic systems and how Joseph Fouché, the French interior minister, relied so heavily on counterespionage and disinformation.

Presenter

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

An accomplished lecturer, historian and author, Dr. Courteaux received his PhD in History from the University of Paris-Sorbonne and was a faculty member at Royal Military College and at Ryerson University. He is a frequent lecturer for later life learning programs in Toronto, including those at Glendon College and Ryerson University, and spoke at TALG’s series on China’s Belt & Road Initiative in 2021. He is the author of Canada Between Vichy and Free France, 1940-1945 (2013) and Four days that rocked Quebec on Charles de Gaulle's famous 1967 "Vive le Québec Libre" (2017). He is currently working on his latest book, Suez, 1869, the last triumph of the Empress Eugenie.

September 28, 2022
The Great War

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

Following decades where covert operations played a key role, belligerent countries made good use of espionage to break the stalemate on the battlefield. Intelligence services helped bring the U.S. into the war in 1917. A look at the shift from human intelligence to code breaking, air reconnaissance and camouflage, plus deception on ‘a grand scale.’

Presenter

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

An accomplished lecturer, historian and author, Dr. Courteaux received his PhD in History from the University of Paris-Sorbonne and was a faculty member at Royal Military College and at Ryerson University. He is a frequent lecturer for later life learning programs in Toronto, including those at Glendon College and Ryerson University, and spoke at TALG’s series on China’s Belt & Road Initiative in 2021. He is the author of Canada Between Vichy and Free France, 1940-1945 (2013) and Four days that rocked Quebec on Charles de Gaulle's famous 1967 "Vive le Québec Libre" (2017). He is currently working on his latest book, Suez, 1869, the last triumph of the Empress Eugenie.

 

October 5, 2022
The War of Spies (1937-1941)

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

From Japan’s 1937 invasion of China to Operation Barbarossa (German invasion of the USSR in June 1941) and Pearl Harbor, deception and counterespionage played a crucial role. Richard Sorge, a German journalist working for Stalin, warned Moscow of Germany’s invasion plan.

Presenter

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

An accomplished lecturer, historian and author, Dr. Courteaux received his PhD in History from the University of Paris-Sorbonne and was a faculty member at Royal Military College and at Ryerson University. He is a frequent lecturer for later life learning programs in Toronto, including those at Glendon College and Ryerson University, and spoke at TALG’s series on China’s Belt & Road Initiative in 2021. He is the author of Canada Between Vichy and Free France, 1940-1945 (2013) and Four days that rocked Quebec on Charles de Gaulle's famous 1967 "Vive le Québec Libre" (2017). He is currently working on his latest book, Suez, 1869, the last triumph of the Empress Eugenie.

 

October 12, 2022
Covert operations, ruses, and bluff in the Second World War

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

Conspiracies, ruses, covert operations, and deception ruled the day. A look at Operation Bodyguard, the most sophisticated deception, which paved the way to the landings in Normandy and the liberation of Western Europe. Portraits of daring men and women who helped win WWII.

Presenter

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

An accomplished lecturer, historian and author, Dr. Courteaux received his PhD in History from the University of Paris-Sorbonne and was a faculty member at Royal Military College and at Ryerson University. He is a frequent lecturer for later life learning programs in Toronto, including those at Glendon College and Ryerson University, and spoke at TALG’s series on China’s Belt & Road Initiative in 2021. He is the author of Canada Between Vichy and Free France, 1940-1945 (2013) and Four days that rocked Quebec on Charles de Gaulle's famous 1967 "Vive le Québec Libre" (2017). He is currently working on his latest book, Suez, 1869, the last triumph of the Empress Eugenie.

October 19 , 2022
Cold War Espionage, Part I: Protecting the biggest secret of the War.

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

The role of espionage in the race to build the atomic bomb. As the U.S. tried to protect the Manhattan Project, Soviet spy rings uncovered the secrets behind the atomic bomb, increasing tension between the U.S. and the USSR - the “Red Scare” of the fifties and anti-communist paranoia.

Presenter

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

An accomplished lecturer, historian and author, Dr. Courteaux received his PhD in History from the University of Paris-Sorbonne and was a faculty member at Royal Military College and at Ryerson University. He is a frequent lecturer for later life learning programs in Toronto, including those at Glendon College and Ryerson University, and spoke at TALG’s series on China’s Belt & Road Initiative in 2021. He is the author of Canada Between Vichy and Free France, 1940-1945 (2013) and Four days that rocked Quebec on Charles de Gaulle's famous 1967 "Vive le Québec Libre" (2017). He is currently working on his latest book, Suez, 1869, the last triumph of the Empress Eugenie.

October 26 , 2022
Cold War Espionage, Part II: Red menace and covert operations

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

Tensions between East and West quickly rose following the Second World War. A look at the rise of the CIA and its growing role in international crises, including the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Vietnam War and CIA cooperation with Latin-American dictatorships.

Presenter

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

An accomplished lecturer, historian and author, Dr. Courteaux received his PhD in History from the University of Paris-Sorbonne and was a faculty member at Royal Military College and at Ryerson University. He is a frequent lecturer for later life learning programs in Toronto, including those at Glendon College and Ryerson University, and spoke at TALG’s series on China’s Belt & Road Initiative in 2021. He is the author of Canada Between Vichy and Free France, 1940-1945 (2013) and Four days that rocked Quebec on Charles de Gaulle's famous 1967 "Vive le Québec Libre" (2017). He is currently working on his latest book, Suez, 1869, the last triumph of the Empress Eugenie.

November 2, 2022
From 9-11 to Cyberespionage

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 ushered in a new era of international relations and espionage. A look at the rise of radical Islamism, the intelligence failure that led to the 9-11 attacks, the emergence of cyberterrorism, the scandal of Wikileaks and foreign interference in elections. What will the future hold for cyberespionage?

Presenter

Dr. Olivier Courteaux

An accomplished lecturer, historian and author, Dr. Courteaux received his PhD in History from the University of Paris-Sorbonne and was a faculty member at Royal Military College and at Ryerson University. He is a frequent lecturer for later life learning programs in Toronto, including those at Glendon College and Ryerson University, and spoke at TALG’s series on China’s Belt & Road Initiative in 2021. He is the author of Canada Between Vichy and Free France, 1940-1945 (2013) and Four days that rocked Quebec on Charles de Gaulle's famous 1967 "Vive le Québec Libre" (2017). He is currently working on his latest book, Suez, 1869, the last triumph of the Empress Eugenie.

 

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