logo

TALG's lectures are held at Harcourt United Church, 87 Dean Avenue in Guelph, and simultaneously streamed online. You may choose to attend in person or by watching from home.  All registrants will receive a weekly email with the link to Wednesday's lecture.  If you opt to watch online, please note the lecture is available only at the regularly scheduled time; lectures do not remain online for viewing at later times or dates.

Registration is now open and will continue until September 4th.  We do not accept late registrations.

Please note:  If you opt to watch lectures online from home, you must watch them at their scheduled date and time.

We do not record lectures for viewing at another time.     

 

AM Series: Wednesdays, September 11 to October 30, 2024, 10am - noon

Water, Water, Everywhere

Water, it covers over 70% of our planet and is essential to all life on Earth.

This series will examine the management and protection of our water supply from local concerns to global challenges ensuring a clean, safe and adequate water supply. Speakers will discuss water systems in Ontario such as the Grand River watershed, designated as a Heritage River 30 years ago. We will continue with talks on water advocacy, indigenous perspectives on water and the need for water security as well as the part water plays in our health and economy.

This is such an important topic with so many experts eager to share their knowledge that we found it challenging to limit this series to eight lectures. We hope you will enjoy our choice of topics from many different perspectives on this vital issue.

Water, Water, Everywhere
September 11, 2024
Burden of disease associated with consumption of private well water

Heather Murphy

Well water is often thought to be free of microbiological contamination because of the incorrect assumption that the soil environment will naturally filter out disease-causing organisms. Dr. Murphy will present on her research in Pennsylvania illustrating that this is not the case. She will also speak about her large-scale health study under way in Pennsylvania called the “Wells and Enteric disease Transmission Trial (WET-Trial)”. The study is trying to understand if well water treatment by ultraviolet light can reduce disease in children under the age of 5 that drink untreated well water.

Presenter

Heather Murphy

Dr. Murphy is an Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in One Health at the University of Guelph. She has over twenty years of experience in water/wastewater treatment, water quality, drinking water distribution, risk assessment and environmental health in both North America and abroad. Dr. Murphy obtained her PhD in Environmental Engineering from the University of Guelph, Canada. Following her PhD, she worked for the United Nations International Emergency Children’s Fund (UNICEF) as a Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Specialist in Mali and Madagascar. She returned to academia in 2013 and completed a research fellowship with the Public Health Agency of Canada where she focused on quantifying the burden of waterborne disease on the Canadian population. She then joined Temple University’s College of Public Health where she was an Assistant Professor for 5 years and where she currently maintains an adjunct Associate Research Professor Position. She leads the Water, Health and Applied Microbiology (WHAM) Lab where her research focuses on microbial quality of water and health.

You may contact Heather Murphy after the lecture for questions at: heather.murphy@uoguelph.ca

Follow-up information:

www.whamlab.org

www.wettrial.org

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/37390656/ 

https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/bmjopen/13/3/e068560.full.pdf

September 18, 2024
Indigenous Perspectives on Water and Water Security

Dr. Susan Chiblow

TBA

Presenter

Dr. Susan Chiblow

TBA

 

September 25, 2024
Watershed planning for the Grand River – past and future directions

Janet Ivey, Grand River Conservation Authority

The Grand River flows through the heart of one of the fastest growing areas of the Province of Ontario. Since the 1930s, water managers at all levels of government and other interest holders have worked to reduce the impacts of flooding, ensure sufficient water supplies, and improve water quality in the Grand River. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the designation of the Grand River as a Canadian Heritage River. The Grand River Conservation Authority and others are celebrating this milestone and working collaboratively to improve the health of the watershed. The speaker will share information about the Grand River Water Management Plan and how it aims to ensure the Grand River can continue to support both ecosystems and growing communities.

Presenter

Janet Ivey, Grand River Conservation Authority

Janet Ivey has over 20 years of experience in watershed planning, coordinating interdisciplinary teams, and engaging communities and agencies. She has worked at scales ranging from a neighbourhood of a thousand people, to watersheds with a population of over 4 million. Jan is the Manager of Water Resources for the Grand River Conservation Authority, overseeing delivery of groundwater, water quality, drinking water source protection, and landowner stewardship programs.

You may contact Janet Ivey after the lecture for questions at: jivey@grandriver.ca

Follow-up information: www.grandriver.ca

October 2, 2024
Leveraging People Power for Water & Beyond: Grassroots Change-making for Water Protection

Arlene Slocombe

Water is life, yet it is under threat around the world. Join us as we explore our theory of change, how we pursue inclusive water justice in solidarity, and how it connects with the larger climate crisis and environmental justice awakening happening around the globe.

Presenter

Arlene Slocombe

Water Watchers co-founder Arlene Slocombe has been actively involved and committed to the work of the Wellington Water Watchers from the beginning. She has served as Executive Director since 2009. Arlene and two children learned a great deal about water stewardship living a simple off grid life along the banks of the Eramosa River, just southeast of Guelph. While collecting the water that she and her family drank from a spring that bubbled from the ground near her home, Arlene had the privilege to viscerally experience the sacred nature of water that sustains all life.

“I do this work because I know deep in my being that the way we treat water is the way we treat all of life – including ourselves.”

You may contact Arlene Slocombe after the lecture for questions at: info@wellingtonwaterwatchers.ca

Follow-up information: Wellington Water Watchers actions and tools change in real time, so further information will be provided at the end of the lecture.

October 9, 2024
The Economic Value of Water

Dr. Roy Brouwer

TBA

Presenter:

Dr. Roy Brouwer

Roy Brouwer is Professor of Economics and Executive Director of the Water Institute at the University of Waterloo. He obtained his PhD degree in environmental economics from the University of East Anglia in the UK and his MSc degree in agricultural economics from Wageningen Agricultural University, the Netherlands. Before joining the University of Waterloo, he was head of the department Environmental Economics at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He is the founding editor-in-chief of the Elsevier journal Water Resources and Economics.

 

October 16, 2024
Green Infrastructure to Protect Urban Streams and Wetlands

Dr. Andrea Bradford

The quantity and quality of water is important to protect the ecological functions of streams and wetlands. The increase in impervious areas (buildings, pavement) associated with urbanization causes most rainfall to become surface runoff (rather than infiltrating into the ground or returning to the atmosphere). Urbanization affects water quality but also the timing, frequency and duration of different flow conditions. Green infrastructure (both natural and engineered) can be used to protect water quality and water patterns. The approach is important to maintain groundwater recharge and the thermal regime of watercourses. The lecture will describe green infrastructure, such as bioretention, bioswales, green roofs and rainwater harvesting, and how different types of green infrastructure can be combined into a system to mitigate hydrological impacts and achieve environmental and social co-benefits in urban areas. 

Presenter

Dr. Andrea Bradford

Andrea Bradford obtained her PhD from Queen’s University, focusing her dissertation on the ecohydrology of the Minesing Wetlands in Ontario. She has been a faculty member in Water Resources Engineering at the University of Guelph since 2002 and has provided expert testimony on the impacts of development on streams and wetlands. She is passionate about advancing management and design approaches to meet the needs of aquatic systems and protect the well-being of the people who depend upon them. Dr. Bradford was awarded the University of Guelph Faculty Association Distinguished Professor Award for Innovation in Teaching in 2020.

Dr. Bradford will provide her contact information at the end of the presentation.

October 23, 2024
Telling Stories About Water Using Photography

Rob de Loë

Local water management organizations face a dilemma: they require the support of their communities to do their work, but the members of those communities may lack the technical knowledge needed to understand or care about that work. When we need people to care about water, but they can’t understand the science, we must try something different. One approach that has promise is using art, which can reach people through emotions rather than logic. Rob has been working with local water management organizations to create stories about water using photographs. Images can be a great way to motivate questions, spark curiosity, and get people interested in knowing more about water. In his talk, Rob will show how putting images together to create visual stories about water in our communities can open the door to deeper conversations about how we affect water, and how we can come together to protect water.

Presenter

Rob de Loë

Rob de Loë is a Professor in the School of Environment, Resources and Sustainability at the University of Waterloo. He’s been a passionate water researcher for nearly four decades. He spent most of his career studying how we can do a better job of protecting and managing water resources and responding to new threats and pressures such as climate change. Starting in 2020, he wound up his water governance research program and started in a new direction that explores how art and science can be brought together through photography to help people better understand water challenges.

 You may contact Rob de Loe after the lecture for questions at: rdeloe@uwaterloo.ca 

Follow-up information: If people are curious they can look at the photography website: www.robdeloephotography.com 

October 30, 2024
Sharing across the Space” Water and the Two Row Wampum (Kaswentha)

Henry Lickers

The Two Row is composed of two rows of purple beads on a white background.

The white background represents the River of Life and the purple represent the Haudenosaunee and the other peoples who travel the river. We cannot distinguish between the two rows since we are all of one human family but may have different ways of doing things. The two rows are separated (The Space) by 3 beads representing the Great way of Peace: Respect, Power and Peace since this is the way we will communicate and interact (Sharing). It is said that each will stay in their own vessel and not try to steer each other vessels. However, we have a responsibility to the other vessel to warn them of danger whenever we perceive it (Across) so that we can both safely navigate the problem.

Presenter

Henry Lickers

Henry Lickers is a member of Seneca Nation, Turtle Clan. He has been married for 53 years and has three grown children and three granddaughters. He was the Director of the Mohawk Council of Akwesasne, Department of the Environment for 37 years and 6 years as Senior Environmental Science Officer. He was the first Indigenous Canadian Commissioner appointed to the International Joint Commission.

Some of his other commitments have been:

  • Principal investigator on the EAGLE (Effect on Aboriginal in the Great Lakes Environment) Project with Health Canada and AFN/Chiefs of Ontario.
  • Principal investigator on Naturalized Knowledge Systems Project with the Environmental Institute, University of Ottawa.
  • Co-Chair of the COSEWIC Aboriginal Subcommittee
  • Co-Chair, The Haudenosaunee Environmental Taskforce.
  • Vice President, Board of Director,

 St. Lawrence River Institute of Environmental Sciences.

  • Board of Director, Eastern Ontario Model Forest.
  • Member of the Panel on Ecological Integrity of Canada's National Parks.
  • Member, The Scientific Advisory Committee, Northern River Basin

You may contact Henry Lickers after the lecture for questions at: aw653@sympatico.ca.

 

Registration >

PM Series: Wednesdays, September 11 to October 30, 2024, 1:30-3:30pm

Human Migration: Many Journeys Across Time and Space

Join us for an exploration of Human Migration. Human Migration is a fundamental experience of human history. It has shaped societies, cultures and economies across the world. In 2024, the world is divided on how to cope with an ever-increasing number of people who wish to migrate for a variety of reasons. For many of them, the decision is crucial, and life-threatening. In this 8-week lecture series we will explore the "who, what, when, where, why, and how" of human migration and look at what is happening now across the globe. We will also examine the increasing importance of the factor of climate change and what we might expect in the near and far future. 

Human Migration

 

 

September 11, 2024
Migration at Home

Jenna Hennebry

This lecture brings migration home, offering a perspective on our mobile world that grounds understanding of migration in local everyday experiences. How is migration experienced in Canadian communities? How are communities connected across the globe? Asking these questions, as well as who moves (who doesn't), why, how and where in the world, this lecture will discuss experiences of international migration, migration pathways and transnational communities. The lecture will outline how migration is governed at global, national and local levels, and point to key issues such as ensuring the labour and human rights of people on the move. Detailing the emergence of the new UN Global Compact for Safe Orderly and Regular Migration, this lecture will conclude with a synopsis of this important moment in history and what lays ahead for governments, migrants and communities, at local and global levels.

Presenter

Jenna Hennebry

Jenna Hennebry is a Full Professor at the Balsillie School of International Affairs, Wilfrid Laurier University and an expert on global migration governance, labour migration and gender. She is Co-Founder of the International Migration Research Centre (IMRC) and the Migration Worker Health Project, and Founder of the Gender+Migration Hub funded by IRCC. She has served as an expert advisor to the Auditor General of Canada, the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal, the Government of Canada’s Delegation to the United Nations, and an expert consultant to the UN Special Rapporteur for the Human Rights of Migrants, UN Women, the IOM and other UN agencies. Dr. Hennebry has published over 75 articles and has been an invited speaker at the UN General Assembly, and at numerous international conferences. 

Bio website:  https://www.balsillieschool.ca/people/jenna-l-hennebry/

You may contact Jenna Hennebry after the lecture for questions at: jhennebry@wlu.ca

Follow-up information:

https://www.facebook.com/internationalmigrationresearchcentre/

https://www.balsillieschool.ca/people/jenna-l-hennebry/

https://gendermigrationhub.org/

https://www.migrantworker.ca/

September 18, 2024
Welcoming and Unwelcoming Indians in 19th Century European Colonies

Femi Kolapo

The lecture will briefly describe the nature and pattern of Indian presence in Europe’s Caribbean and American colonies in the 19th century

It will analyze the causes of Indian migration from continental India into the Caribbean and other European colonies, highlighting the nature of the welcome that Indians were met with and whether and how this changed over the duration of the migration.

It will discuss the phenomenon of Indians becoming unwelcome and will assess what relationship economic, political, and social factors had with the changing nature of the welcome and the onset of their unwelcome.

We will then conclude by briefly discussing the nature of Indians’ engagement with host society reception and whether the patterns of host acceptance and resistance apply to contemporary experiences of Asian and African immigrants to North America.

Presenter

Femi Kolapo

Kolapo has been a professor in the History Department of the University of Guelph for two decades. Among others, he has taught courses relating to the History of Africa, the Atlantic slave trade and abolition, and the migration of indentured Indian laborers. His current research focuses on European Christian missionary interrelations with 19th century African society.

You may contact Femi Kolapo after the lecture for questions at: kolapof@uoguelph.ca

Follow-up information:

  1. Singh, R. "Chapter 15 International migration from India: an historical overview". In Handbook of Culture and Migration, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2021).
  2. Origin of World’s Largest Migrant Population, India Seeks to Leverage Immigration. https://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/india-migration-country-profile
September 25th , 2024
Human Migration and Climate Change

Geneviève Minville

Climate migrants have often been depicted by media and environmental scholars as the face of climate change. Yet, the link between migration and climate change is not as simple and direct as we might think. Instead, it's complex, indirect, and insidious. This thought-provoking lecture will discuss the relationship between environmental factors and various types of human displacement, such as evacuation, forced migration, and planned relocation. It will highlight the importance of being place-specific when analyzing this type of migration. It will show how citizens in Western countries like Canada are also at risk of experiencing climate migration. This lecture will allow participants to understand how, ultimately, all migration happens in the context of climate and environmental change, although at very different degrees. 

Presenter

Geneviève Minville

Geneviève Minville is a PhD student in Human Geography at York University in Toronto. She holds a Master’s degree in International Development and Globalization, a Certificate in International Cooperation, and a Bachelor’s degree in Social Work. Before pursuing graduate studies in geography, she worked as a social worker with immigrants settled in Montreal. Now, she is interested in uncovering the structural and systemic issues leading to migration in the context of climate and environmental change, using a feminist political ecology perspective, especially in Southeast Asia and the Canadian context. She has disseminated the findings of her work in various contexts, including in an upcoming book chapter, in a podcast, and at multiple conferences. 

You may contact Genevieve Minville after the lecture for questions at: genmin@yorku.ca

 

October 2 2024
Gender in Migration: Why Care About It?

Hari KC

This lecture will reflect on how gender shapes the experiences and outcomes for female and gender-diverse (e.g., LGBTQI+) migrants and how migration, in turn, could contribute to reshaping gender power relations. The lecture begins with a critical overview of key contemporary trends and patterns of international migration, migrant stock and categories, and geographic distributions. The large number of females migrating globally now (135 million out of 281 million) is often taken as an indication to women’s hypermobility across international borders, but the lecture critiques such a grossly generalized notion that hides global migration inequality and the gendered immobilities of women, girls and gender-diverse persons. The lecture dissects how migration experiences and outcomes greatly vary across different groups/categories of migrants as seen in many women migrating mainly as domestic workers/housemaids working in extremely precarious conditions. Further, the lecture questions as to why LGBTQI+ migrants are oddly invisible within public, policy, and even activist circles. The lecture also shows how, despite various gender-based precarities faced by migrants around the world, migration has empowered many women and it has the potential to reshape inequal gender power relations. Finally, the lecture zeroes in on the ways in which migration could be leveraged to attain gender equality instead of using gender as a code in migration.

Presenter

Hari KC

Hari is a migration scholar with research interests in the politics of migration and mobility with a particular focus on labour migration from South Asia to the Gulf countries in Asia. In his doctoral research, he examines the issues of Nepali women migrant domestic workers in the Gulf countries in Asia based on his ethnographic fieldwork in Nepal, Qatar, Kuwait, and the United Arab Emirates. He has collaborated on several research projects, including the ‘Gender + Migration Hub’ which seeks to enhance the capacity of governments, civil society and other stakeholders in designing and implementing gender-responsive migration policies and programs around the world. Hari KC is currently a Research Fellow with the Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) in Migration and Integration program at Toronto Metropolitan University. He was formerly a Postdoctoral Fellow at Wilfrid Laurier University where his work examined, from a gender perspective, the nexus between migration, migration governance and food in/security in the context of South Asia. Hari teaches at Wilfrid Laurier University as a part-time faculty. He has previously worked for various NGOs (e.g., BBC Media Action, Carter Centre) in Nepal. Hari has a PhD in Global Governance from the Balsillie School of International Affairs, and master’s degrees in English and Peace and Conflict Studies both from the University of Waterloo.

You may contact Hari KC after the lecture for questions at: hkc@wlu.ca / hkc@balsillieschool.ca for any questions.

Follow-up information:

Article titled “Bilateral labor agreements as migration governance tools: An analysis from a gender lens” available https://www.degruyter.com/journal/key/til/23/2/html?lang=en

“Gender + Migration Hub” available at https://gendermigrationhub.org (please have a look if you could)

Research report titled “Gender and migration data” available at https://publications.iom.int/system/files/pdf/Gender-and-Migration-Data.pdf

October 9, 2024
Boats, Borders and Solidarity at Sea: Civil Society Search and Rescue Operations in the Central Mediterranean

Dr. Michael Gordon

The lecture examines the externalization of migration control, the criminalization of humanitarianism, and acts of solidarity through the work of civil society Search and Rescue (SAR) operations. In looking at grassroots organizations and the spatial politics of the sea, I explore the unique and fluid dimensions of the Mediterranean Sea as a border security space. This lecture engages with the tension between the enactment of solidarity with people on the move alongside broader state efforts to externalize border security and criminalize humanitarianism. Examining the invocation and operation of humanitarianism at sea illuminates emergent trends around bordering, mobility, and citizenship as migrants and civil society confront the state security apparatus. This borderscape is enacted through contentious NGO acts of solidarity with migrants at sea as grassroots organizations challenge the appropriation of the natural environment as a border control mechanism. The talk highlights how these political acts of rescue expose the violence of state borders, while simultaneously enacting solidarity with people on the move as an actively anti-racist, justice and rights seeking movement.

Presenter

Dr. Michael Gordon

Michael Gordon is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the International Migration Research Centre (IMRC). His research broadly surrounds irregularized migration and the externalization of European border controls, with a particular focus on the acts of solidarity through the work of civil society Search and Rescue (SAR) operations. These research interests coalesce around the theoretical intersections between sovereignty, solidarity, forced migration and borders at the supposed margins of the Global North. Michael holds a PhD in International Relations from McMaster University. Currently, he serves as a Co-Editor of Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees.

You may contact Michael Gordon after the lecture for questions at: mgordon@wlu.ca

October 16, 2024
War, Work & Want: How the OPEC Oil Crisis Caused Mass Migration & Revolution.

Randall Hansen

Today, global migration is at a historic high of over 280 million people. Mass migration has transformed international and domestic politics. Such migration is not only unprecedented; it was—at least in the global north—unexpected and unwanted. Publics across Europe, North America, and Asia oppose immigration, and events in the early 1970s should have led to a decline in migration. Instead, global migration tripled. The book asks why. It argues that economic and geopolitical changes unleashed by the OPEC oil crisis led to an unanticipated surge in global migration. Economically, the quadrupling of oil prices halved growth rates in the West, they never recovered, and wages have stagnated for five decades. In response, consumers rebuilt their standard of living on the back of cheap migrant labor. At the same time, OPEC flooded the Middle East and Russia with oil money, destabilizing Iran, ushering in the Iranian Revolution, contributing to Moscow’s 1979 decision to invade Afghanistan, and leading to the two Gulf Wars. In the non-oil-producing states, Egypt and Syria, OPEC-induced inflation put the last nail in the coffin of import substitution industrialization (using tariffs to industrialize), forced a turn to neoliberalism, and led to inequality, mass protests, terrorism (Egypt), and civil war (Syria). These simultaneous economic and geopolitical developments, all set in motion by the OPEC oil crisis, resulted in 115 million migrants that few in the global north expected or wanted.

Presenter

Randall Hansen

Randall Hansen is Canada Research Chair in the Department of Political Science and Director of the Global Migration Lab at the University of Toronto’s Munk School. He works on migration & citizenship, eugenics & population policy, and the effect of war on civilian populations.

His published works include War, Work, and Want: How the OPEC Oil Crisis Generated Revolution & Mass Migration (New York: Oxford University Press, 2023); Fire & Fury: the Allied Bombing of Germany and Japan (London: Faber, 2020);  Disobeying Hitler: German Resistance after July 20, 1944 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013), Sterilized by the State: Eugenics, Race and the Population Scare in 20th Century North America (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013), Fire & Fury: the Allied Bombing of Germany (New York: Penguin, 2009), and Citizenship and Immigration in Post-War Britain (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000).

He has also co-edited Immigration and Public Opinion in Liberal Democracies (with David Leal and Gary P. Freeman) (New York: Routledge, 2012), Migration, States and International Cooperation (with Jeannette Money and Jobst Koehler, Routledge, 2011), Towards a European Nationality (with Patrick Weil, Palgrave, 2001), Dual Nationality, Social Rights, and Federal Citizenship in the U.S. and Europe (with Patrick Weil, Berghahn, 2002), and Immigration and asylum from 1900 to the present [with M. Gibney, ABC-CLIO, 2005].

October 23, 2024
The Policies and Politics of Immigration in Western Democracies

Edward Koning

Over the last four decades, immigration has become one of the most prominent and volatile issues in Western democratic politics. It is not just that the flow of people across borders is increasing. Immigration has also left an indelible mark on public policy, political discourse, and party politics. This lecture offers an introduction to the politics and policies of immigration. It begins by examining how Western democracies have aimed to govern migration with policies related to admission, residence, citizenship, and integration. It then discusses the ways in which immigration has become a transformative force in electoral and legislative politics.

Presenter

Edward Koning

Edward Koning is associate professor of Political Science at the University of Guelph (Ontario, Canada). Most of his research investigates the politics of immigration in Western democracies, specifically regarding immigrants’ social rights and the role of populist anti-immigrant parties. He is the author of Immigration and the Politics of Welfare Exclusion (University of Toronto Press, 2019), and has publications in leading academic journals, including Comparative European Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Journal of Public Policy, and Party Politics.

You may contact Edward Koning after the lecture for questions at: ekoning@uoguelph.ca

Follow up Information:

https://utorontopress.com/9781487530662/immigration-and-the-politics-of-welfare-exclusion/

https://utorontopress.com/9781487546342/the-exclusion-of-immigrants-from-welfare-programs/

October 30, 2024
Road People: The Global Crisis of Flight Migration

Doug Saunders

Contrary to popular image, there is no immigration crisis in the world today – global immigration levels haven’t increased in eight decades. But the years since 2020 have seen a truly alarming global crisis of “road people” – those who’ve been forced to leave their country but don’t have a certain place to settle, so are living on the move. The world now holds 103 million crisis migrants or, in United Nations terms, “forcibly displaced people.” That is the largest number in human history (though there were periods in the 20th century when a larger share of the population was refugees). Almost three-quarters of them originate from five countries – Ukraine, Venezuela, Syria, Afghanistan and Sudan – that have either been invaded, fallen into civil war or have become failed states. Most of them are settled, temporarily or otherwise, in only five adjoining countries, but millions remain on the move. They tend to make headlines when they try to cross the southern borders of Europe, the United States or Canada en masse – a dangerous and sometimes tragic outcome that is entirely preventable. Saunders will discuss the roots of the crisis and the policy failures that force hundreds of thousands of displaced families to make dangerous decisions.

Presenter

Doug Saunders

Doug Saunders is the international-affairs columnist for The Globe and Mail and author of the books Arrival City: The Final Migration and Our Next World (2011), The Myth of the Muslim Tide (2012) and Maximum Canada (2017). During 2019-2021 he was resident in Berlin as a Richard von Weizsäcker Fellow at the Robert Bosch Academy, and in 2022 designed a self-integration framework for urban migrants on behalf of the International Organization for Migration. He served as the Globe and Mail's London-based European bureau chief for a decade, after having run the paper's Los Angeles bureau, and has written extensively from East Asia, the Indian Subcontinent, the Middle East, North Africa and the Americas. He has won the National Newspaper Award on seven occasions as well as the Schelling Prize for Architectural Theory, the Donner Prize and the National Library of China Wenjin Book Award. He was a co-designer of the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale's Germany pavilion, which was based on is book Arrival City. In April 2024 the Canadian National Newspaper Awards named him Journalist of the Year for his series documenting the dangerous journeys taken by millions of global migrants. In awarding the prize the jury wrote, “The time, energy, personal risk and extraordinary ingenuity Doug Saunders put into this assignment produced the most detailed and touching portrait of migration on a global scale that our jury has ever seen.” He is currently studying the effects of the suburbanization of immigration settlement in multiple countries.

You may contact Doug Sanders after the lecture for questions at: dsaunders@globeandmail.com

Registration >

Contact Us Today!

TALG welcomes your enquiries, input and feedback! We’d love to hear from you, whether you have a question, a great topic or speaker to suggest, or are interested in volunteering.

Get in Touch >
Older student

Subscribe to our Mailing List!

to receive notifications about upcoming lecture series, registration, and other important announcements.

You may unsubscribe at anytime using the “Unsubscribe” link at the bottom of any mailing list notification.